Lessons from my vegetable garden

I enjoy gardening–especially when the weather is cooler. Usually I don’t have too much difficulty getting a reasonable crop from my vegetable garden. This year, however, was different:

  • I’ve had a great supply all year of chard.
  • I can’t keep up with the peppers and okra.
  • Tomatoes, not so good this year. Lack of water, perhaps?
  • Fig tree–barren. It gets one more year and then I’ll chop it down!
  • Lemon tree–was doing great until the grandkids picked about 20 baby lemons for a game they were playing.
  • Peaches–squirrels got them over a weekend when I was away 😦
  • Squash of all kinds–zero!
  • Melons canteloupe and water melons–two!
  • Eggplants–one!

These last three vegetables are a little different. They all have distinguishable male and female flowers, and it takes cross-pollination of a female flower to produce fruit. Usually, if I’m having a poor harvest, I’ll cross pollinate the flowers with a brush.

This year, however, that was not possible.

None of my plants had any female flowers! So no harvest.

Makes you think.

Peppers and okra

Both male and female

Floyd McClung has reached out to the women God brought across his path and championed them in their callings. For more than 20 years, he and his wife, Sally, have discipled women who are now making a difference in the nations. Floyd contributed a chapter to The Black Swan Effect: A response to gender hierarchy in the church. Here’s a quote from the chapter.

To be clear, I believe leaders can be both male and female. Obviously the church body is comprised of both genders. And certainly, martyrs have been both male and female. Missionaries are both male and female.

But it is important to be more specific, lest we overlook the obvious: both women and men have impacted nations for God because both genders are called by God and both are given leadership gifts.

I believe leadership in the church is not meant to be gender-specific because, at its core, leadership is about service. It is not about an office or position. Leaders don’t serve in order to be leaders; they serve because that’s what leaders do. Leaders serve. Period. When we abandon a hierarchical, worldly view of leadership and consider it from this perspective, we can see that both woman and men can, and already do, use their gifts to serve–that is, lead.

The church worldwide has been shaped, led , and taught by both men and women– starting in the home, and moving into every sphere of church and public life.

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