Repost: Another “Sophie Muller” Story

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Ricardo with veteran missionary to Venezuela, Buck Smith

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Puerto Ayacucho

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Prayer at dawn overlooking Pto. Ayacucho

 

Here is another story about Sophie Muller. (For more information about her from people who knew her, check out the comments on the post, “The Amazing Story of Sophie Muller.“)   Again, this is in Ricardo’s own words.

“I was born in the jungle and I knew Sophie Muller. She was my neighbor. She lived just like us in a house with clay walls and a palm roof. She ate the same food as we did. She hated the comfortable life. In the last twenty to thirty years she ate very little—maybe an egg a day and some chocolate drink. She was a woman totally given over to walking with God. Sometimes we would get up at 3am and we could hear her singing to the Lord in the next house.

“My mother would go with Sophie on trips sometimes. She saw many supernatural things happen.

“When I was around ten years old one of the most important of these supernatural incidents occurred. It became known by all the tribespeople throughout the jungle. Incited by the Catholic Church, the Columbian army persecuted Sophie Muller. She was put in a jail with double doors and double locks. As she lay there, she could hear the soldiers fighting amongst themselves as to who would be the first to rape her. They decided to play a game, and the winner would be the one to go first. But while they were playing, Sophie fell into a very deep sleep. When she woke up, she was in the middle of the jungle.

“In the meantime, my father had pulled together a group armed with bows and arrows to go and rescue her. As they were paddling up river in their dugout canoes they saw a beach with a big turtle sitting on it. Of course, their immediate thought was food—in fact, banquet! So they pulled up onto the beach to jump the turtle. As they did so they heard a whistle. My father recognized the whistle and went looking. It was Sophie, hiding behind a rock. She had had days of just eating roots and was too weak to even call out. She was covered with cuts and scratches with even maggots on her wounds. So they put her in the bottom of the boat wrapped in plastic and paddled up river past various army groups who were no doubt looking for her. When they came to Sophie’s house there was a team there from the mission. They came out to greet her.

“Don’t be sad or worried,” she told them. “Nothing happened. I’m going north for a few days to recover.”

“Fifteen days later she was back in the jungle.”

  • robin

    I have many stories about Sophie but I do not have one photo. Does anyone have a photgo of this extraordinary woman ?

  • Felicity Dale

    The only picture I was able to find was on the Urbana website. You can see it at http://www.urbana.org/wtoday.witnesses.cfm?article=79